Effects of Xanax Use

Xanax is the most commonly prescribed drug for treating anxiety and panic disorders. The effects of Xanax will depend greatly on whether the person is using it as prescribed or recreationally.

What Are the Effects of Using Xanax?

Xanax is the brand name of the Benzodiazepine also known as Alprazolam. It is the most commonly prescribed drug for treating anxiety and panic disorders. The effects of Xanax will depend greatly on whether the person is using it as prescribed or recreationally. When taken as prescribed, Xanax corrects chemical imbalance in the brain.

Xanax is prescribed in tablet form that, when taken orally, gets absorbed into the body through the stomach, passes through the mucous membrane and enters the liver. The chemicals then enter your bloodstream and work their way into the brain. Benzodiazepines such as Xanax work on the GABA-A receptors on the brain. These receptors are activated by GABA neurotransmitters, and thus producing sedative effects. Xanax is considered an agonist, meaning it amplifies the effects of the GABA-A receptors.

A person who is experiencing anxiety has an increase in chemicals such as adrenaline and a deficiency in GABA. A chemical imbalance of high adrenaline and low levels of GABA increase excitement in the brain and drugs like Xanax are used to correct the imbalance. If you are taking Xanax as it’s intended, then it should alleviate symptoms of anxiety and you may feel “normal” after the first dose. Those who take it recreationally, or without a prescription, will experience a heavy sedative state. Unlike other drugs that produce a “high” or euphoric feeling, those under the influence of Xanax claim to feel more relaxed, quiet, and tired. Using Xanax recreationally will cause sedative and calming effects but create an imbalance in the brain that may have not existed before.

Rehabs are still open!

Learn More

Side Effects of Using Xanax

Xanax can be habit-forming so it should only be taken as prescribed. Misuse of this drug can cause addiction, overdose, or even death. Common side effects may include:

  • Drowsiness or feeling tired
  • Slurred speech and lack of balance or coordination
  • Memory problems
  • Feeling anxious early in the morning

You should call your doctor if you experience any of the following while taking Xanax:

  • Depressive moods
  • Thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself
  • Increased energy
  • Racing thoughts
  • Unusual risk-taking behavior
  • Agitation
  • Hostility
  • Confusion
  • Tremors or Seizures
  • Increased or pounding heartbeat

Questions about treatment?

Get 24/7 help. Call now for:

  • Access to top treatment centers
  • Caring, supportive assistance
  • Financial assistance options
(877) 648-4288

Effects of Xanax with Other Substances

Xanax should never be taken in combination with other substances, especially alcohol and Opioid medications. Drinking while taking Xanax may increase the effects of alcohol, causing you to feel more drowsy, dizzy, or tired. Xanax can interact with many medications including:

  • Oral contraceptives
  • Antifungals
  • Antidepressants
  • Antibiotics
  • Heartburn drugs
  • Opioids

Mixing any of these drugs may prevent the pathway responsible for eliminating Xanax from your body as quickly as possible. Over some time, this blockage can lead to a toxic buildup of the drug and result in an overdose.

Help is out there

Reach out to a dedicated treatment professional and learn how you can create the life you want.

Withdrawal from Xanax

The effects of Xanax become stronger as the dose increases, and most people begin to experience its effects within 5 to 10 minutes of taking it. Peak effects usually occur after one or two hours and the strongest impacts can be felt up to 4 hours after taking a dose. Lingering effects or “fuzzy feelings” may continue as the drug wears off. It’s possible to build up a tolerance to Xanax quickly, which can result in withdrawal symptoms if a person becomes dependent.

As Xanax begins to wear off, you may stop feeling the calm, relaxed, lethargic sensations associated with the drug. This is referred to a comedown, when the letdown of high emotions follows peak drug effects. A comedown is not the same thing as withdrawal, and symptoms of withdrawal typically begin two to seven days after the last dose of Xanax. Withdrawal symptoms my last two to eight weeks. Do not stop taking Xanax without talking to a medical provider as some withdrawal symptoms can be dangerous. It is best to taper off high doses until you can quit entirely. Symptoms of withdrawal include:

  • Insomnia
  • Restlessness
  • Nervousness
  • Aggression
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Worsened anxiety or panic attacks
  • Poor concentration
  • Seizures

Overdose from Xanax

If you are taking Xanax, it’s important to know that repeated use over time can lead to withdrawal symptoms within a short amount of time. It is recommended that people should not take a Benzodiazepine more than three days in a row. The only way to completely avoid risks is to not take the drug at all. Tolerance to Xanax could lead to taking more than the necessary amount in order to feel the full effects and result in an overdose. Overdose symptoms may include:

  • Extreme drowsiness
  • Confusion
  • Muscle Weakness
  • Loss of balance or coordination
  • Feeling light-headed
  • Fainting

Taking Xanax with other drugs that make you sleepy or slow your breathing can cause serious side effects, coma, or death.

Take action & empower yourself

Call now to be connected to a compassionate treatment professional.

Stop the Effects of Xanax Today

Regular recreational users of Xanax may develop problems with anxiety in addition to a physical dependency. They may continue to use the drug in order to avoid withdrawal symptoms and thus, taking Xanax to self-medicate. The effects of Xanax can be dangerous or even fatal when not taken as prescribed. If you are struggling with addiction contact a recovery provider for guidance in ending substance abuse today.

What are you struggling with?

There are many different forms of addiction. Get the information you need to help you overcome yours.

Treatment professionals are waiting for your call

(877) 648-4288

or

Treatment professionals are waiting for your call

(877) 648-4288